Yahoo! Gets Free Food, Thanks to New CEO Marissa Mayer


Free food might buy Yahoo! the morale it needs to revitalize

There’s no such thing as a free lunch — unless you work for Yahoo! Now, employees of this struggling tech giant no longer have to shell out $5.61 for a Teriyaki chicken panini every day at lunch, thanks to brand new CEO Marissa Mayer’s declaration of free food for all.

Along with the establishment of weekly Friday-afternoon meetings and a promise to improve basically everything about the company, Mayer made all the food in the “URLs Café” free. Until now, only the coffee-bar drinks have been paid for by company co-founders Jerry Yang and David Filo.

Read more: "Bloodthirsty" Groupon Blamed For Waffle Shop's Demise

Mayer hails from the sunny, Razor-scooters-and-video-games-filled offices of Google, where food has always been free and morale has always been high. Perhaps noticing the connection, she brought the policy to Yahoo! as part of an attempt to raise spirits amongst the company’s wary workers.

Yahoo finally “has a seat at the cool kids’ table” in Silicon Valley, where free food is old news. Along with Google, Facebook and Twitter also provide their employees with free snacks and daily catered meals. Google boasts lunch and dinner provided by in-house gourmet chefs, while Tagged touts a stocked kitchen, weekly happy hour, on-site breakfast, and lunch and dinner catered by top restaurants in the area.

Read more: Hillary Rodham Clinton Takes Charge in the Kitchen for Diplomatic Dinners

Clearly, ample free food is essential to technological innovation. Looks like the hopes and dreams of Yahoo’s future are being built on the joy of free meals — we’re optimistic.


For Yahoo CEO, Two New Roles

Just hours after Yahoo Inc. named Marissa Mayer as its new chief, the real conversation kicked in: how she will juggle pregnancy and being the CEO charged with saving a foundering Internet giant.

The 37-year-old former Google Inc. executive is expecting her first child, a son, in early October. On Tuesday, she started her new job at Yahoo, which reported another quarter of lackluster sales growth.

"If she succeeds, it will be a landmark case for women everywhere," says Kevin Coyne, a management consultant who teaches business strategy at Emory University. "Women will talk about her for decades."

No Yahoo directors expressed concern about her pregnancy, according to Ms. Mayer, who told the board in late June, about a week after Yahoo's recruiter contacted her. She says she plans to work during her maternity leave, which will last several weeks.

New fathers regularly take on senior posts, but most mothers who run big companies waited to take on CEO roles until their 40s or 50s, when their children were older. The key to making this work for both family and Yahoo, according to some of these mothers: a phalanx of nannies, a solid leadership team and a husband ready to shoulder more of the hands-on parental duties.


For Yahoo CEO, Two New Roles

Just hours after Yahoo Inc. named Marissa Mayer as its new chief, the real conversation kicked in: how she will juggle pregnancy and being the CEO charged with saving a foundering Internet giant.

The 37-year-old former Google Inc. executive is expecting her first child, a son, in early October. On Tuesday, she started her new job at Yahoo, which reported another quarter of lackluster sales growth.

"If she succeeds, it will be a landmark case for women everywhere," says Kevin Coyne, a management consultant who teaches business strategy at Emory University. "Women will talk about her for decades."

No Yahoo directors expressed concern about her pregnancy, according to Ms. Mayer, who told the board in late June, about a week after Yahoo's recruiter contacted her. She says she plans to work during her maternity leave, which will last several weeks.

New fathers regularly take on senior posts, but most mothers who run big companies waited to take on CEO roles until their 40s or 50s, when their children were older. The key to making this work for both family and Yahoo, according to some of these mothers: a phalanx of nannies, a solid leadership team and a husband ready to shoulder more of the hands-on parental duties.


For Yahoo CEO, Two New Roles

Just hours after Yahoo Inc. named Marissa Mayer as its new chief, the real conversation kicked in: how she will juggle pregnancy and being the CEO charged with saving a foundering Internet giant.

The 37-year-old former Google Inc. executive is expecting her first child, a son, in early October. On Tuesday, she started her new job at Yahoo, which reported another quarter of lackluster sales growth.

"If she succeeds, it will be a landmark case for women everywhere," says Kevin Coyne, a management consultant who teaches business strategy at Emory University. "Women will talk about her for decades."

No Yahoo directors expressed concern about her pregnancy, according to Ms. Mayer, who told the board in late June, about a week after Yahoo's recruiter contacted her. She says she plans to work during her maternity leave, which will last several weeks.

New fathers regularly take on senior posts, but most mothers who run big companies waited to take on CEO roles until their 40s or 50s, when their children were older. The key to making this work for both family and Yahoo, according to some of these mothers: a phalanx of nannies, a solid leadership team and a husband ready to shoulder more of the hands-on parental duties.


For Yahoo CEO, Two New Roles

Just hours after Yahoo Inc. named Marissa Mayer as its new chief, the real conversation kicked in: how she will juggle pregnancy and being the CEO charged with saving a foundering Internet giant.

The 37-year-old former Google Inc. executive is expecting her first child, a son, in early October. On Tuesday, she started her new job at Yahoo, which reported another quarter of lackluster sales growth.

"If she succeeds, it will be a landmark case for women everywhere," says Kevin Coyne, a management consultant who teaches business strategy at Emory University. "Women will talk about her for decades."

No Yahoo directors expressed concern about her pregnancy, according to Ms. Mayer, who told the board in late June, about a week after Yahoo's recruiter contacted her. She says she plans to work during her maternity leave, which will last several weeks.

New fathers regularly take on senior posts, but most mothers who run big companies waited to take on CEO roles until their 40s or 50s, when their children were older. The key to making this work for both family and Yahoo, according to some of these mothers: a phalanx of nannies, a solid leadership team and a husband ready to shoulder more of the hands-on parental duties.


For Yahoo CEO, Two New Roles

Just hours after Yahoo Inc. named Marissa Mayer as its new chief, the real conversation kicked in: how she will juggle pregnancy and being the CEO charged with saving a foundering Internet giant.

The 37-year-old former Google Inc. executive is expecting her first child, a son, in early October. On Tuesday, she started her new job at Yahoo, which reported another quarter of lackluster sales growth.

"If she succeeds, it will be a landmark case for women everywhere," says Kevin Coyne, a management consultant who teaches business strategy at Emory University. "Women will talk about her for decades."

No Yahoo directors expressed concern about her pregnancy, according to Ms. Mayer, who told the board in late June, about a week after Yahoo's recruiter contacted her. She says she plans to work during her maternity leave, which will last several weeks.

New fathers regularly take on senior posts, but most mothers who run big companies waited to take on CEO roles until their 40s or 50s, when their children were older. The key to making this work for both family and Yahoo, according to some of these mothers: a phalanx of nannies, a solid leadership team and a husband ready to shoulder more of the hands-on parental duties.


For Yahoo CEO, Two New Roles

Just hours after Yahoo Inc. named Marissa Mayer as its new chief, the real conversation kicked in: how she will juggle pregnancy and being the CEO charged with saving a foundering Internet giant.

The 37-year-old former Google Inc. executive is expecting her first child, a son, in early October. On Tuesday, she started her new job at Yahoo, which reported another quarter of lackluster sales growth.

"If she succeeds, it will be a landmark case for women everywhere," says Kevin Coyne, a management consultant who teaches business strategy at Emory University. "Women will talk about her for decades."

No Yahoo directors expressed concern about her pregnancy, according to Ms. Mayer, who told the board in late June, about a week after Yahoo's recruiter contacted her. She says she plans to work during her maternity leave, which will last several weeks.

New fathers regularly take on senior posts, but most mothers who run big companies waited to take on CEO roles until their 40s or 50s, when their children were older. The key to making this work for both family and Yahoo, according to some of these mothers: a phalanx of nannies, a solid leadership team and a husband ready to shoulder more of the hands-on parental duties.


For Yahoo CEO, Two New Roles

Just hours after Yahoo Inc. named Marissa Mayer as its new chief, the real conversation kicked in: how she will juggle pregnancy and being the CEO charged with saving a foundering Internet giant.

The 37-year-old former Google Inc. executive is expecting her first child, a son, in early October. On Tuesday, she started her new job at Yahoo, which reported another quarter of lackluster sales growth.

"If she succeeds, it will be a landmark case for women everywhere," says Kevin Coyne, a management consultant who teaches business strategy at Emory University. "Women will talk about her for decades."

No Yahoo directors expressed concern about her pregnancy, according to Ms. Mayer, who told the board in late June, about a week after Yahoo's recruiter contacted her. She says she plans to work during her maternity leave, which will last several weeks.

New fathers regularly take on senior posts, but most mothers who run big companies waited to take on CEO roles until their 40s or 50s, when their children were older. The key to making this work for both family and Yahoo, according to some of these mothers: a phalanx of nannies, a solid leadership team and a husband ready to shoulder more of the hands-on parental duties.


For Yahoo CEO, Two New Roles

Just hours after Yahoo Inc. named Marissa Mayer as its new chief, the real conversation kicked in: how she will juggle pregnancy and being the CEO charged with saving a foundering Internet giant.

The 37-year-old former Google Inc. executive is expecting her first child, a son, in early October. On Tuesday, she started her new job at Yahoo, which reported another quarter of lackluster sales growth.

"If she succeeds, it will be a landmark case for women everywhere," says Kevin Coyne, a management consultant who teaches business strategy at Emory University. "Women will talk about her for decades."

No Yahoo directors expressed concern about her pregnancy, according to Ms. Mayer, who told the board in late June, about a week after Yahoo's recruiter contacted her. She says she plans to work during her maternity leave, which will last several weeks.

New fathers regularly take on senior posts, but most mothers who run big companies waited to take on CEO roles until their 40s or 50s, when their children were older. The key to making this work for both family and Yahoo, according to some of these mothers: a phalanx of nannies, a solid leadership team and a husband ready to shoulder more of the hands-on parental duties.


For Yahoo CEO, Two New Roles

Just hours after Yahoo Inc. named Marissa Mayer as its new chief, the real conversation kicked in: how she will juggle pregnancy and being the CEO charged with saving a foundering Internet giant.

The 37-year-old former Google Inc. executive is expecting her first child, a son, in early October. On Tuesday, she started her new job at Yahoo, which reported another quarter of lackluster sales growth.

"If she succeeds, it will be a landmark case for women everywhere," says Kevin Coyne, a management consultant who teaches business strategy at Emory University. "Women will talk about her for decades."

No Yahoo directors expressed concern about her pregnancy, according to Ms. Mayer, who told the board in late June, about a week after Yahoo's recruiter contacted her. She says she plans to work during her maternity leave, which will last several weeks.

New fathers regularly take on senior posts, but most mothers who run big companies waited to take on CEO roles until their 40s or 50s, when their children were older. The key to making this work for both family and Yahoo, according to some of these mothers: a phalanx of nannies, a solid leadership team and a husband ready to shoulder more of the hands-on parental duties.


For Yahoo CEO, Two New Roles

Just hours after Yahoo Inc. named Marissa Mayer as its new chief, the real conversation kicked in: how she will juggle pregnancy and being the CEO charged with saving a foundering Internet giant.

The 37-year-old former Google Inc. executive is expecting her first child, a son, in early October. On Tuesday, she started her new job at Yahoo, which reported another quarter of lackluster sales growth.

"If she succeeds, it will be a landmark case for women everywhere," says Kevin Coyne, a management consultant who teaches business strategy at Emory University. "Women will talk about her for decades."

No Yahoo directors expressed concern about her pregnancy, according to Ms. Mayer, who told the board in late June, about a week after Yahoo's recruiter contacted her. She says she plans to work during her maternity leave, which will last several weeks.

New fathers regularly take on senior posts, but most mothers who run big companies waited to take on CEO roles until their 40s or 50s, when their children were older. The key to making this work for both family and Yahoo, according to some of these mothers: a phalanx of nannies, a solid leadership team and a husband ready to shoulder more of the hands-on parental duties.


Watch the video: Lets Get Down to Business Podcast. Episode 2 - Getting Started


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