LA’s Tavern to Host a Lowcountry Boil



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Tavern was one of my old stomping grounds when I lived in Brentwood. Today, I explore a different side to Tavern, a more down home cooking side.

Recently I attended an exclusive media preview for Tavern’s Fourth Annual Low Country Boil, which will take place Sunday, June 25. Tavern’s chef de cuisine, Amy Deaderick, hosts this boil, which the Tavern owners Suzanne Goin and Caroline Styne fully endorse. This annual boil is very personal to Deaderick, who grew up in South Carolina. Memories of her childhood and the Carolina culture inspire every course.

For $65 per person, this one-time event will be set in The Larder at Tavern, serving up three courses and dessert. South Carolina-based musicians Josh and Leslie Roberts will be providing live acoustic folk-country tunes to really set a “dining by the shoreline” ambiance. The communal tables are covered with newspapers and — warning — you may get wet, so come out in your “eatin’ dress.”

To start, guests will be provided boiled peanuts and fried pickles and have a choice between two cocktails; the Barrier Island (light and dark rum, Aperol, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, cherries, and cranberries) and the Isle of Palms (vodka, Lillet, watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew, and pear). Both cocktails are sweet, fruity, and easy to gulp down quick.

1st Course — Southern Potluck Board
Pimento Cheese, Benton’s country ham, confit chicken rillettes, pickled okra, chow-chow, potato salad, and Triscuits (as Deaderick explains, “to keep it real”).
For those not familiar with Benton’s country ham, owner Allen Benton was inducted into the James Beard Foundation’s Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America in 2015. This was my first time tasting the ham, which was shaved to a perfect paper-thin slice. The chow-chow was another first for me. This mix of peppers and onions is based on a recipe from Deaderick’s mother.

2nd Course — Radish and Corn Salad
Scallions, house-made buttermilk cheese, fried cornbread croutons, and lime.
My table was gushing over the cornbread croutons, and while they were fantastic, the cheese on the dish was the star for me. It’s simple but so light and creamy; I was making sure to dip every piece of lettuce in it.

3rd Course — Carolina Seafood Boil
Gulf shrimp, crawfish, house-made Andouille sausage, potatoes, and corn.
It had been a while since I last peeled a crawfish; you grab the head firmly with one hand and then grab the tail with the other. Twist and peel from the head, peel the shell and suck out the tail. Some people like to suck out the head too (honestly, not my thing!). One bucket caters to two guests, but it’s still a very big portion. The andouille sausage is smoky and meaty, and the Gulf shrimp are sweet and soft.

Dessert — Cornmeal Peach Cobbler With Buttermilk Ice Cream
This dessert was made by Tavern pastry chef Sahar Shomali. One of her favorite ingredients to incorporate into her desserts is cornmeal, and there’s no better time to do this than at a boil! The sweet, juicy peach flavor is in every bite to accompany the crumbly cobbler.

As you can see, this is one messy but fun Southern boil you won’t want to miss! For a reservation, call 310-806-6464.


Low Country Boil Recipe

A lowcountry boil is the southeastern coast's equivalent to a New England clambake. Take the fresh shellfish catch of the day, dump it in a giant pot with some vegetables and sausage, and you're more than halfway to a giant feast for you and your friends. The boils I attended growing up were usually full of shrimp, potatoes, and corn, but there can be quite a bit of variance in the pot.

In Rebecca Lang's Around the Southern Table, the lowcountry boil includes crawfish along with the requisite shrimp, but crab would be just as welcome. Generous pieces of spicy smoked sausage bring out the Cajun side of the blend, and a big box of extra-spicy boil seasoning adds even more heat to the mix. Drain and dump the boil out on a table covered in newspapers for a fun mess of a meal.

Why I picked this recipe: Summer may be prime lowcountry boil season, but I couldn't wait that long. There's something about eating hot seafood with your hands that brings sunshine to even the dreariest of late-winter days.

What worked: Lang's cooking method is spot on. The components are layered into a stockpot of boiling water, seasoning, and beer (!) at timed intervals so the potatoes are perfectly tender just as the shrimp turns opaque.

What didn't: Nothing.

Suggested tweaks: If you can't get your hands on crawfish (it's still a bit early in the season right now), you can simply double the amount of shrimp in the recipe. I followed the suggestion on my crab boil seasoning packet and added 4 tablespoons of kosher salt to the water before adding the vegetables.

Reprinted from Around The Southern Table: Coming home to comforting meals and treasured memories by Rebecca Lang. Copyright 2012. Published by Oxmoor House. All rights reserved. Available wherever books are sold.


Low Country Boil Recipe

A lowcountry boil is the southeastern coast's equivalent to a New England clambake. Take the fresh shellfish catch of the day, dump it in a giant pot with some vegetables and sausage, and you're more than halfway to a giant feast for you and your friends. The boils I attended growing up were usually full of shrimp, potatoes, and corn, but there can be quite a bit of variance in the pot.

In Rebecca Lang's Around the Southern Table, the lowcountry boil includes crawfish along with the requisite shrimp, but crab would be just as welcome. Generous pieces of spicy smoked sausage bring out the Cajun side of the blend, and a big box of extra-spicy boil seasoning adds even more heat to the mix. Drain and dump the boil out on a table covered in newspapers for a fun mess of a meal.

Why I picked this recipe: Summer may be prime lowcountry boil season, but I couldn't wait that long. There's something about eating hot seafood with your hands that brings sunshine to even the dreariest of late-winter days.

What worked: Lang's cooking method is spot on. The components are layered into a stockpot of boiling water, seasoning, and beer (!) at timed intervals so the potatoes are perfectly tender just as the shrimp turns opaque.

What didn't: Nothing.

Suggested tweaks: If you can't get your hands on crawfish (it's still a bit early in the season right now), you can simply double the amount of shrimp in the recipe. I followed the suggestion on my crab boil seasoning packet and added 4 tablespoons of kosher salt to the water before adding the vegetables.

Reprinted from Around The Southern Table: Coming home to comforting meals and treasured memories by Rebecca Lang. Copyright 2012. Published by Oxmoor House. All rights reserved. Available wherever books are sold.


Low Country Boil Recipe

A lowcountry boil is the southeastern coast's equivalent to a New England clambake. Take the fresh shellfish catch of the day, dump it in a giant pot with some vegetables and sausage, and you're more than halfway to a giant feast for you and your friends. The boils I attended growing up were usually full of shrimp, potatoes, and corn, but there can be quite a bit of variance in the pot.

In Rebecca Lang's Around the Southern Table, the lowcountry boil includes crawfish along with the requisite shrimp, but crab would be just as welcome. Generous pieces of spicy smoked sausage bring out the Cajun side of the blend, and a big box of extra-spicy boil seasoning adds even more heat to the mix. Drain and dump the boil out on a table covered in newspapers for a fun mess of a meal.

Why I picked this recipe: Summer may be prime lowcountry boil season, but I couldn't wait that long. There's something about eating hot seafood with your hands that brings sunshine to even the dreariest of late-winter days.

What worked: Lang's cooking method is spot on. The components are layered into a stockpot of boiling water, seasoning, and beer (!) at timed intervals so the potatoes are perfectly tender just as the shrimp turns opaque.

What didn't: Nothing.

Suggested tweaks: If you can't get your hands on crawfish (it's still a bit early in the season right now), you can simply double the amount of shrimp in the recipe. I followed the suggestion on my crab boil seasoning packet and added 4 tablespoons of kosher salt to the water before adding the vegetables.

Reprinted from Around The Southern Table: Coming home to comforting meals and treasured memories by Rebecca Lang. Copyright 2012. Published by Oxmoor House. All rights reserved. Available wherever books are sold.


Low Country Boil Recipe

A lowcountry boil is the southeastern coast's equivalent to a New England clambake. Take the fresh shellfish catch of the day, dump it in a giant pot with some vegetables and sausage, and you're more than halfway to a giant feast for you and your friends. The boils I attended growing up were usually full of shrimp, potatoes, and corn, but there can be quite a bit of variance in the pot.

In Rebecca Lang's Around the Southern Table, the lowcountry boil includes crawfish along with the requisite shrimp, but crab would be just as welcome. Generous pieces of spicy smoked sausage bring out the Cajun side of the blend, and a big box of extra-spicy boil seasoning adds even more heat to the mix. Drain and dump the boil out on a table covered in newspapers for a fun mess of a meal.

Why I picked this recipe: Summer may be prime lowcountry boil season, but I couldn't wait that long. There's something about eating hot seafood with your hands that brings sunshine to even the dreariest of late-winter days.

What worked: Lang's cooking method is spot on. The components are layered into a stockpot of boiling water, seasoning, and beer (!) at timed intervals so the potatoes are perfectly tender just as the shrimp turns opaque.

What didn't: Nothing.

Suggested tweaks: If you can't get your hands on crawfish (it's still a bit early in the season right now), you can simply double the amount of shrimp in the recipe. I followed the suggestion on my crab boil seasoning packet and added 4 tablespoons of kosher salt to the water before adding the vegetables.

Reprinted from Around The Southern Table: Coming home to comforting meals and treasured memories by Rebecca Lang. Copyright 2012. Published by Oxmoor House. All rights reserved. Available wherever books are sold.


Low Country Boil Recipe

A lowcountry boil is the southeastern coast's equivalent to a New England clambake. Take the fresh shellfish catch of the day, dump it in a giant pot with some vegetables and sausage, and you're more than halfway to a giant feast for you and your friends. The boils I attended growing up were usually full of shrimp, potatoes, and corn, but there can be quite a bit of variance in the pot.

In Rebecca Lang's Around the Southern Table, the lowcountry boil includes crawfish along with the requisite shrimp, but crab would be just as welcome. Generous pieces of spicy smoked sausage bring out the Cajun side of the blend, and a big box of extra-spicy boil seasoning adds even more heat to the mix. Drain and dump the boil out on a table covered in newspapers for a fun mess of a meal.

Why I picked this recipe: Summer may be prime lowcountry boil season, but I couldn't wait that long. There's something about eating hot seafood with your hands that brings sunshine to even the dreariest of late-winter days.

What worked: Lang's cooking method is spot on. The components are layered into a stockpot of boiling water, seasoning, and beer (!) at timed intervals so the potatoes are perfectly tender just as the shrimp turns opaque.

What didn't: Nothing.

Suggested tweaks: If you can't get your hands on crawfish (it's still a bit early in the season right now), you can simply double the amount of shrimp in the recipe. I followed the suggestion on my crab boil seasoning packet and added 4 tablespoons of kosher salt to the water before adding the vegetables.

Reprinted from Around The Southern Table: Coming home to comforting meals and treasured memories by Rebecca Lang. Copyright 2012. Published by Oxmoor House. All rights reserved. Available wherever books are sold.


Low Country Boil Recipe

A lowcountry boil is the southeastern coast's equivalent to a New England clambake. Take the fresh shellfish catch of the day, dump it in a giant pot with some vegetables and sausage, and you're more than halfway to a giant feast for you and your friends. The boils I attended growing up were usually full of shrimp, potatoes, and corn, but there can be quite a bit of variance in the pot.

In Rebecca Lang's Around the Southern Table, the lowcountry boil includes crawfish along with the requisite shrimp, but crab would be just as welcome. Generous pieces of spicy smoked sausage bring out the Cajun side of the blend, and a big box of extra-spicy boil seasoning adds even more heat to the mix. Drain and dump the boil out on a table covered in newspapers for a fun mess of a meal.

Why I picked this recipe: Summer may be prime lowcountry boil season, but I couldn't wait that long. There's something about eating hot seafood with your hands that brings sunshine to even the dreariest of late-winter days.

What worked: Lang's cooking method is spot on. The components are layered into a stockpot of boiling water, seasoning, and beer (!) at timed intervals so the potatoes are perfectly tender just as the shrimp turns opaque.

What didn't: Nothing.

Suggested tweaks: If you can't get your hands on crawfish (it's still a bit early in the season right now), you can simply double the amount of shrimp in the recipe. I followed the suggestion on my crab boil seasoning packet and added 4 tablespoons of kosher salt to the water before adding the vegetables.

Reprinted from Around The Southern Table: Coming home to comforting meals and treasured memories by Rebecca Lang. Copyright 2012. Published by Oxmoor House. All rights reserved. Available wherever books are sold.


Low Country Boil Recipe

A lowcountry boil is the southeastern coast's equivalent to a New England clambake. Take the fresh shellfish catch of the day, dump it in a giant pot with some vegetables and sausage, and you're more than halfway to a giant feast for you and your friends. The boils I attended growing up were usually full of shrimp, potatoes, and corn, but there can be quite a bit of variance in the pot.

In Rebecca Lang's Around the Southern Table, the lowcountry boil includes crawfish along with the requisite shrimp, but crab would be just as welcome. Generous pieces of spicy smoked sausage bring out the Cajun side of the blend, and a big box of extra-spicy boil seasoning adds even more heat to the mix. Drain and dump the boil out on a table covered in newspapers for a fun mess of a meal.

Why I picked this recipe: Summer may be prime lowcountry boil season, but I couldn't wait that long. There's something about eating hot seafood with your hands that brings sunshine to even the dreariest of late-winter days.

What worked: Lang's cooking method is spot on. The components are layered into a stockpot of boiling water, seasoning, and beer (!) at timed intervals so the potatoes are perfectly tender just as the shrimp turns opaque.

What didn't: Nothing.

Suggested tweaks: If you can't get your hands on crawfish (it's still a bit early in the season right now), you can simply double the amount of shrimp in the recipe. I followed the suggestion on my crab boil seasoning packet and added 4 tablespoons of kosher salt to the water before adding the vegetables.

Reprinted from Around The Southern Table: Coming home to comforting meals and treasured memories by Rebecca Lang. Copyright 2012. Published by Oxmoor House. All rights reserved. Available wherever books are sold.


Low Country Boil Recipe

A lowcountry boil is the southeastern coast's equivalent to a New England clambake. Take the fresh shellfish catch of the day, dump it in a giant pot with some vegetables and sausage, and you're more than halfway to a giant feast for you and your friends. The boils I attended growing up were usually full of shrimp, potatoes, and corn, but there can be quite a bit of variance in the pot.

In Rebecca Lang's Around the Southern Table, the lowcountry boil includes crawfish along with the requisite shrimp, but crab would be just as welcome. Generous pieces of spicy smoked sausage bring out the Cajun side of the blend, and a big box of extra-spicy boil seasoning adds even more heat to the mix. Drain and dump the boil out on a table covered in newspapers for a fun mess of a meal.

Why I picked this recipe: Summer may be prime lowcountry boil season, but I couldn't wait that long. There's something about eating hot seafood with your hands that brings sunshine to even the dreariest of late-winter days.

What worked: Lang's cooking method is spot on. The components are layered into a stockpot of boiling water, seasoning, and beer (!) at timed intervals so the potatoes are perfectly tender just as the shrimp turns opaque.

What didn't: Nothing.

Suggested tweaks: If you can't get your hands on crawfish (it's still a bit early in the season right now), you can simply double the amount of shrimp in the recipe. I followed the suggestion on my crab boil seasoning packet and added 4 tablespoons of kosher salt to the water before adding the vegetables.

Reprinted from Around The Southern Table: Coming home to comforting meals and treasured memories by Rebecca Lang. Copyright 2012. Published by Oxmoor House. All rights reserved. Available wherever books are sold.


Low Country Boil Recipe

A lowcountry boil is the southeastern coast's equivalent to a New England clambake. Take the fresh shellfish catch of the day, dump it in a giant pot with some vegetables and sausage, and you're more than halfway to a giant feast for you and your friends. The boils I attended growing up were usually full of shrimp, potatoes, and corn, but there can be quite a bit of variance in the pot.

In Rebecca Lang's Around the Southern Table, the lowcountry boil includes crawfish along with the requisite shrimp, but crab would be just as welcome. Generous pieces of spicy smoked sausage bring out the Cajun side of the blend, and a big box of extra-spicy boil seasoning adds even more heat to the mix. Drain and dump the boil out on a table covered in newspapers for a fun mess of a meal.

Why I picked this recipe: Summer may be prime lowcountry boil season, but I couldn't wait that long. There's something about eating hot seafood with your hands that brings sunshine to even the dreariest of late-winter days.

What worked: Lang's cooking method is spot on. The components are layered into a stockpot of boiling water, seasoning, and beer (!) at timed intervals so the potatoes are perfectly tender just as the shrimp turns opaque.

What didn't: Nothing.

Suggested tweaks: If you can't get your hands on crawfish (it's still a bit early in the season right now), you can simply double the amount of shrimp in the recipe. I followed the suggestion on my crab boil seasoning packet and added 4 tablespoons of kosher salt to the water before adding the vegetables.

Reprinted from Around The Southern Table: Coming home to comforting meals and treasured memories by Rebecca Lang. Copyright 2012. Published by Oxmoor House. All rights reserved. Available wherever books are sold.


Low Country Boil Recipe

A lowcountry boil is the southeastern coast's equivalent to a New England clambake. Take the fresh shellfish catch of the day, dump it in a giant pot with some vegetables and sausage, and you're more than halfway to a giant feast for you and your friends. The boils I attended growing up were usually full of shrimp, potatoes, and corn, but there can be quite a bit of variance in the pot.

In Rebecca Lang's Around the Southern Table, the lowcountry boil includes crawfish along with the requisite shrimp, but crab would be just as welcome. Generous pieces of spicy smoked sausage bring out the Cajun side of the blend, and a big box of extra-spicy boil seasoning adds even more heat to the mix. Drain and dump the boil out on a table covered in newspapers for a fun mess of a meal.

Why I picked this recipe: Summer may be prime lowcountry boil season, but I couldn't wait that long. There's something about eating hot seafood with your hands that brings sunshine to even the dreariest of late-winter days.

What worked: Lang's cooking method is spot on. The components are layered into a stockpot of boiling water, seasoning, and beer (!) at timed intervals so the potatoes are perfectly tender just as the shrimp turns opaque.

What didn't: Nothing.

Suggested tweaks: If you can't get your hands on crawfish (it's still a bit early in the season right now), you can simply double the amount of shrimp in the recipe. I followed the suggestion on my crab boil seasoning packet and added 4 tablespoons of kosher salt to the water before adding the vegetables.

Reprinted from Around The Southern Table: Coming home to comforting meals and treasured memories by Rebecca Lang. Copyright 2012. Published by Oxmoor House. All rights reserved. Available wherever books are sold.


Watch the video: Recipe Low Country Boil


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